Metavid

Screen%20Shot%202019-03-10%20at%208.58.2Metavid is a free-software site that hosts United States public domain legislative footage. Through closed-captioning text from a “simple Linux box”[1]that records “everything C-SPAN shoots,”[1] Metavid can provide “brief searchable clips”[1] of legislative footage. Online communities can engage with the audio and video media archives which are not usually viewed by the public but told second hand through other media outlets. Metavid captures a non-bias recording of legislative meetings so that the people can draw their own opinions and ideas. The close-captioned text allows users to quickly and easily search through the thousands of hours of archived footage so that all the related media appears in the search results.

The Conversation Map

Warren Sack developed The Conversation Map in order to visualize a comment/reference chain of certain media posts within a forum or archive. The Conversation Map is an interface that analyzes archives and sites based on words and their relationship to each other[2]. Each line on the interface represents a connection or a citation to the post within an archive, like a Facebook, forum, or reddit post. A dot means that there is no reference or citation made to that specific post. The hottest conversations typically mean it would look more like a spider web of lines in contrast to a post with only one or two lines, representing one or two connections to it.

Seattle Crime Cams

[video src=https://vimeo.com/158497068 height: 200 align:right] Dries Depoorter's Seattle Crime Cams streams surveillance videos in real-time to the gallery installation. The artist tapped into Seattle's surveillance systems by finding the feed of the footage buried in code. This offered him access to a continuous stream of video captured by the city's numerous surveillance cameras. “I found it pretty strange, that the police were sharing all this data to the general public,” he claims. “I had to show what you could do with this… You see just how much surveillance there really is.”

Floribots

139758.jpgFloribots, a massive art piece created by Geoffrey Drake-Brockman in 2005, is essentially an array of 128 simple folding paper flowers that are mechanically controlled. Each large flower extends out of a rigid base, and is capable of mechanically "blooming" and extending higher. Operating under a collective "hive-mind," they are capable of reacting to movement stimulus and even has an array of different "moods" they can display through dynamic movement.

Floribots

[video src=https://youtu.be/xUjPu0Jif-U] Floribots is a 128 robot origami flower interactive installation. It functions with “hive mind” characteristics by sensing the audience’s movement and adapting its behavior accordingly. The artist, Geoffrey Drake-Brockman programmed Floribots to simulate behaviors that are “both of an individual and a colony.” The technology of Floribots makes use of both software and electronics, allowing humans and machine to play creatively together. The artist installed sensors to detect the audience and in response the Floribots dance in waves creating a fun, interactive charged environment. 

Eyeborg (Neil Harbisson’s Cyborg Antenna)

Neil_Harbisson_cyborgist.jpgNeil Harbisson is a cyborg artist based in New York City. He is described as a cyborg artist because his artwork his artwork is concerned with the concept of cyborgism but also because he himself is technically a cyborg. He has an antenna implant, which he calls "the Eyeborg." This device is implanted in his skull and was designed to extend the limitations of human color perception. Although he was born completely color blind, he can can now even see infrared and ultraviolet colors that are invisible to humans.

Roomba Paintings

Roombas, or iRobots, have cleaned our carpets and floors since the 1990s [1] and have been an excellent innovation toward better vacuums ever since. In 2006, sculptor Bobby Zokaites saw more than just a better vacuum, he saw a potential tool to create art. What do you get when you take the vacuum out of the Roomba and add a paintbrush? Roomba Paintings!

Doubt

[video src=https://vimeo.com/161752738]In Doubt, artist Carsten Höller challenges our perceptions of reality through coded sequences of light and spatio-temporal illusions. His goal was to blur the lines between spectator and performer within a work of art, while instilling a deep feeling of doubt inside us. The installation begins as a single hallway of light, which subsequently divides itself into two paths, each of which is individually illuminated by either yellow or green lights. Once a spectator chooses a path, they are presented with a multi-level maze of sorts, which combines different sequences of light projection with moments of darkness to challenge our perceptual framework.

Migration (Empire) by Doug Aitken

[video src=[video src=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JZ6cJaGm79E]]American hotel rooms are where Doug Aitken’s short film Migration (Empire) takes place. The artist unexpectedly mixed the scenes of motel room settings with wild animals. As the animal explore the ubiquitous industrial interiors, the film explores the relationship between these American untamed wilderness and our human involvement of industrialization. The film includes many beautiful but also cruel scenes, such as a fox wandering in the motel room and noticing the view outside of the window is different because of the mesh screen; a deer drinking water from a swimming pool; an otter bathing in a bath tub. The film shifts continuously shifts to another animal, another occupant with a new room, suggesting the homelessness embodied by the motel room.

Mypocket

burak-arikan-mypocket-exhibition-neubergMYPOCKET by Burak Arikan traces simultaneously a personal history of expenditures and universal financial forecast. The artist has meticulously retained physical and virtual evidence of all his expenditures, creating a database visualization of their passage and custom software algorithm of their probability of recurrence. The Transactions Feed archives all of his economic interactions (thereby making all his personal financial records public), and posts their percentaged predictions.

NomadicMILK

[video src= https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tdSdGKvCvpA]Esther Polak’s art project NomadicMILK, 2009, shadows two different aspects of the dairy economy in Nigeria. Polak spent the early months of 2009 in the deserts of Nigeria following both the paths of those in charge of the production of the milk, the cow herder, and those in charge of the distribution of the milk, a truck driver. Through visual and GPS recording of both subjects, Polak’s NomadicMILK persuades the observer to redefine new relationships between the environment and technology. Polak introduced a GPS robot to the nomadic cow herders of Nigeria during her data collection. Polak remarked that she was fixated “on how people see their own tracks and how they react with that. When people see their own track, they see part of their life, part of their identity.”

Nocturnal Flow

Erwin Redl’s large-scale light installation Nocturnal Flow presents itself as a sea of LEDs stretching from floor to ceiling of the University of Washington’s Allen Center. Composed of over 10,000 individual light units whose intensity varies through time, the grid-like work serves both to emphasize the verticality of the space in which it is housed, but also to accommodate a natural motion birthed from sterility. The use of environmentally-reponsive sensors also imbues the work with a streak of subjectivity, as it can be perceived in contrasting ways depending not only on angle of view, but also time of day or year.

The Yes Men

[video src=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LiWlvBro9eI align: left height: 200] There are innumerable strategies and motivations behind impersonation on the Internet. Some are legitimate hoaxes, others malicious, others satire. Take this typo for example: Gogle.com. Hypothetically, for every person with a sticky "o" key, or too fast of a double-keystroke, there is someone out there who is able to maliciously attack the unfortunately imperfect typist, logging history, Internet etiquette, and personal data. Inversely, one could hypothetically use similar guerilla tactics to attack companies of questionable moral standing, which is exactly what an internet-hoax group, referred to as “The Yes Men,” have done.

The Painting Fool

close_up_129.jpgThe Painting Fool is a computer program and artwork developed originally in 2001 by Simon Colton and researchers at the Computational Creativity Research Group at Imperial College, London. Colton’s ultimate goal for The Painting Fool was to create a piece that is seen as purely creative, what he refers to as “Computational Creativity”; he believed that to achieve this The Painting Fool was required to have behaviors that are skillful, appreciative, and imaginative. Skillful behaviors deal with the mechanical physical process of painting. The Painting Fool is able to take a scan of a photograph and determine the individual colors used within the composition, grouping them together in similar palettes. In addition The Painting Fool records the different pastel, pencil, and brush strokes as well as an analysis of the animation of strokes

All My Life For Sale

All My Life For Sale is a work by John Freyer where he sells everything he owns online.  When I say everything I mean everything, Freyer finished by selling the domain name itself.  This work of art is part of a collection on Rhizome entitled Digital Archivalism.  This form of art blends anthropology and […]

Life Support Systems – Vanda

In Mateusz Herczka’s work Life Support Systems – Vanda (2004), he seeks to expand the human’s ability to map complex systems with the aid of technology. Herczka comments on the nature of this specie’s existence. “They grow on tree branches with the roots exposed, and they collect water from the morning air. The body of […]

Sound Wall

Peter Vogel’s 2009 Sound Wall is unique in that can be viewed as a standalone sculpture made out of hundreds of photocells and electronic circuits, but also has an interactive sound element that is activated by passing a shadow over specific circuits creating a dynamic user exclusive experience and musical composition. Peter’s ideas for Sound […]

Celestial Mechanics

It is a busy sky, indeed. Celestial Mechanics is a artwork created by Scott Hessels and Gabriel Dunne in 2005. It presents something much closer to home than one might think. Its purpose is to show what is right above us in the skies in the forms of low orbiting satellite pathways. Every satellite, as […]

The Internet Mapping Project

If one could actually see and visualize the virtual Internet world, what would it look like? According to the results of the Internet Mapping Project, the online web appears to be much like a complex tree of many overlapping and connecting branches. The Internet Mapping Project is a colorful digital artwork created by computer scientist […]

Nocturnal Flow

"Nocturnal Flow" is an installation created by artist Erwin Redl, who has done a number of similar pieces around the world involving LED lights. [1] Nocturnal Flow is housed in the atrium of the University of Washington's Paul G. Allen Center and consists of a grid of 17,400 LED lights, which cover the 85-foot brick […]

The LED Kimono Project

SFEMF-BIRGHT-620x413.jpgMiya Masaoka's LED Kimono Project is an installation based, performance piece in which 444 hand-sewn LED light sensors respond to musical and physical conditions. The artist's website, http://www.ledkimono.com/ describes how the instrument/garment is used and offers insights to her mission: "The LED Kimono Project represents an extension of and an expansion upon the large body of work that I have developed in the last decade addressing interactivity with insects, plants, and the human brain."

Experiments in Galvanism

This article is a STUB please make edits and adjustments as suggested on Wikipedia to make it more robust.  Thanks!     Experiments in Galvanism is the culmination of studio and gallery experiments in which a miniature computer is implanted into the dead body of a frog specimen. On the one […]

Payphone, Robert Lazzarini

  Advancements in technology inhibits artists to create amazing works due to the vast choices in medium, nor do artist need to limit themselves to two-dimensional digitally produced art.   “The term rapid prototyping (RP) refers to a class of technologies that can automatically construct physical models from Computer-Aided Design (CAD) data. These […]

aftersherrielevine.com, Michael mandiberg

One of the double-sworded attributes of the digital era is the ease in reproduction of art. The reproduction of an image in order to publicize it to mass media for communication purposes or in order to add to the overall message of the work are two examples of the good side of the sword. The […]

Tribute in Light

“More recently, light has been used as an artistic medium to illuminate a metaphorical passage between the earth and the heavens.” [1] Tribute in Light is not only beautiful aesthetically, but also beautiful in content as it paid a tribute to the victims of 9/11. The NY Daily News describes the work: “The […]

Finding Eutaw and North

Finding Eutaw and North is a 34-minute animation created in 2005 by WeWorkForThem, the collaboration of Michael Paul Young and Michael Cina. The piece consists of a series of a series of abstract vignettes of Young’s 3D animation and Cina’s audio work, which were mixed together live using custom software. The piece combines […]

Polygon Playground

[video src=http://vimeo.com/35134962 height:200 align: left]Polygon Playground is a ‘dynamic lounge object,’ incorporating 3D projection technologies and sensors to detect movement and proximity of people in the room. The physical structure is such that up to 40 people may climb, rest, or walk around it, while sensors cause the ‘landscape’ to continuously change as as long as there is human presence. Often the imagery responds to movements, so running across the top of the structure may cause it to highlight the participants footsteps. Other motifs include grids, filling with water, orbs or color that can be ‘kicked’ around, and various abstract color forms.

Outerspace

4_outerspace_sample.jpgOuterspace is a reactive robotic creature with lifelike interactive behaviour. The robot wants to explore the world surrounding him, or the outer space, exhibiting curiosity and waryness as an aprehensive animal might. A participant may put a hand up to the robot and cause it to pull away, as if surprised at the recognition of another being, then move forward searching for the thing that caught it’s attention. The concept that insprired the work was that an object, inherently not living, cannot have emotion. In order to create an emotional object (the goal), first the thing must be aroused, feel, have a emotion; then comes emotional expression. In technical terms, it must read input and display output.

Mappings

0ablackwhit3f9959f966.jpgBalint Bolygo’s Mappings is a 2005 kinetic sculpture which utilizes the core aspects of the Bolygo’s ethos as an artist. In the sculpture/installation two pens rigged to outlying pendulums transcribe the motions taken by the pendulums onto a rotating sphere, or blank globe. Viewers can interact with the pendulums, pushing them to behave more erratically, or calming them to induce smoother lines. The resulting process essentially becomes the earth mapping its own forces onto a replica of itself, a truly interesting portrayal of mapmaking that encourages the viewer to consider the mass our planet, whose gravitational pull directs the motion of the pendulum and creates the drawings.

Compressionism

6206912899_5645817a99.jpgPart photography, part performance art filtered through an algorithmic structure, Nathaniel Stern's Compressionism uses a document scanner as the tool of choice, which takes on the dual roles of paintbrush and camera: as the scanner bulb moves along its path, the artist follows his own path hovering over various objects and textures. Sometimes linearly, sometimes erratically, he moves according to his own performative instincts. With this kinetic approach, Stern bridges a certain gap between his body and the end result.

Long March: Restart

In 1993, Feng Mengbo created a series of paintings he titled Game Over: The Long March. Painted in the style of 8-bit video games like Mario and Mega Man, the paintings depicted 42 scenes, arranged in order to look like snapshots from a real side scrolling video game. Feng’s protagonist was a nameless Red Army soldier, depicted battling everything from ghosts and giant insects, to sumo wrestlers and astronauts.

AH_Q

Ah_Q.jpgChinese new media artist Feng Mengbo has worked with iconic first person shooters Doom and Quake throughout his career. In Q3 (1999) Feng recorded footage of the game Quake III Arena and superimposed live action video of himself, toting a camera around the battlefield and interviewing contestants, over top. Feng expanded upon this idea in 2002's Q4U (a play on the common abbreviation for the game, Q3A) by completely reworking the game's code to replace all character models with a model of himself, bespecktacled and shirtless, with a gun in one hand and a video camera in the other. Feng's AH-Q, released in 2004 and pictured here, saw the addition of a dance pad used to control all the player character's motions.

The following video, produced by the Creator's Project, includes examples of Feng Mengbo's work and an interview with the artist.

[video src= http://thecreatorsproject.vice.com/creators/feng-mengbo]

Healing Pool

 

picKnepHealingPoolWeb-747755.jpg

The Healing Pool by Brian Knep is a six channel interactive video that was installed in 2008. A glowing pool of organic patterns move and pulse. As a person walks across the video the pattern tears and then continues to rebuild itself. However, the pattern never returns to its original form. Each person who walks across this work leaves a scar. The regenerative piece holds a record or a memory of every interaction it has as it constantly evolves. This work is part of Knep’s healing series and this work investigates artificial intelligence and artificial life. Of this work Knep says, “with these pieces I am focusing on the complexity possible with very simple rules. The patterns and their growth are completely emergent phenomena; they arise from the mathematical equations that the software simulates.”

EyeWriter

[video src=https://vimeo.com/6376466]